SIS Conservation publication

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marika.solo
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SIS Conservation publication

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Issue 3, 2021. Eurasian Spoonbill International Expert Group meeting by video conference on October 2021(Early views)
Issue 2, 2020. With Special Section on Woolly necked Stork ecology and conservation
Issue 1, 2019. Special Issue: Glossy Ibis ecology and conservation
marika.solo
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Posts: 3470
Joined: 29 Sep 2021, 09:38

Re: SIS Conservation publication

Post by marika.solo »

Issue 3, 2021. Eurasian Spoonbill International Expert Group meeting by video conference on October 2021(Early views)
SPECIAL SECTION: Black stork ecology and conservation

The hazards of overhead electric lines to Black Storks Ciconia nigra
(Béla KALOCSA, Enikő Anna TAMÁS)

Abstract
Almost every year the death or serious injury of Black Storks Ciconia nigra caused by overhead electric lines (OEL) is recorded in the Hungarian ringing database. Among the Black Storks with satellite transmitters from Hungary the prevalence of electrocution and collision with overhead electric wires is very high. This is a considerable threat not only near the breeding grounds but along migration routes as well. MME BirdLife Hungary has been working for years in order to decrease the risks posed by overhead electric lines, as the threat affects other species as well (including the White Stork Ciconia ciconia and different raptors). Communication and co operation with electricity providers and the importance of international co operation is also outlined

Discussion
We found 38 Black Stork individuals in the Hungarian databases which suffered fatal casualties (electrocution or collision) on overhead
electric line networks.
As the majority of the data are originating from the ringing database and the registration of non marked individuals has only been possible in the
past few years, it is very likely that the number of Black Storks that lost their lives because of OEL fatalities is much higher than registered. An
important factor is that Black Storks usually use habitats distant from human settlements, this may also influence the number of registered cases as
there may be numerous carcasses which are never found.
According to the analysis of the age distribution of these birds, we found that 64% of them died on their first migration, before leaving Europe (see Figure 3). This finding is in accordance with a case described by Hormann and Richarz (1997). As the survival rate of first year Black Storks is very low (0.1696) based on ring recoveries (Tamás 2011), we suspect that OEL casualties have a significant role in this low number.

https://storkibisspoonbill.org/wp-conte ... alocsa.pdf
marika.solo
Site Admin
Posts: 3470
Joined: 29 Sep 2021, 09:38

Re: SIS Conservation publication

Post by marika.solo »

Issue 3, 2021. Eurasian Spoonbill International Expert Group meeting by video conference on October 2021(Early views)
SPECIAL SECTION: Black stork ecology and conservation

What is wrong with the protection zone of a 1-km radius around Black Stork Ciconia nigra nests?
Andriy A. BOKOTEY, Natalie V. DZIUBENKO, Iu. M. STRUS

Abstract
At the end of 2016, the concept of protection zones around nests of rare species of birds was introduced into Ukrainian legislation. This applies to the Black Stork Ciconia nigra, a species listed in 2009 in the Red Data Book of Ukraine. For all species except Storks, the radius of a protection zone is equal to European standards, but for this particular species, it was increased to a radius of 1,000 m around the nest throughout the whole year. In 2006 2018 studies of the distribution and abundance, biotope preferences, and nesting biology of the species were conducted on the territory of the Ukrainian Polissya (Volyn, Rivne, Zhytomyr, Kyiv, Chernihiv, and Sumy regions). In the Western Polissya (Volyn and Rivne area) permanent monitoring of the nesting biology of Black Stork was done. The studies have shown that the radius of 1,000 m around the nest is excessive and inappropriate. The first drawback of such an approach is the lack of seasonality when creating a protection zone. The second one is such a large radius. This paper aims to provide arguments supporting an optimal size of protection zones around Black Stork nests. It was proven that 54% of nests are located not farther than 200 m from the edge of the forest. The importance of the 500 meter forest area around the nest is also confirmed by Belarusian scientists. According to their data, in 83.3% of cases, the perching place of Black Storks is located within this distance and is needed for birds to estimate the safety of approaching a nest. It is recommended to consider seasonality and to create protection zones of two types: zones of strict protection (with a radius of at least 100 m around the nest) and zones of seasonal protection (radius of not less than 500 m). Within zones of strict protection, any human activity and even the presence of people should be forbidden throughout the year. In areas of seasonal protection, the same should be applied only in a period between March 15 and July 30. On forest roads and clearings that pass through the area of strict protection, we recommend the installation of special signs.

https://storkibisspoonbill.org/wp-conte ... okotey.pdf
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